Quick Guide to Photographing Real Estate (Part 5/7 – Exteriors)

Exterior images are generally easier to capture than interior images as there are less technical elements to consider, and the dynamic range of the image is usually quite narrow.

Each room or space within a home is unique with its own purpose, character, and story. Within this 7-part series I will provide an overview of the key elements of each space, and general instructions, challenges, and tips on how to photograph them. Last week I discussed photographing bathrooms, and in this article I will be discussing exteriors. When composing a shot of the front façade/exterior image of a property, you want to focus on highlighting certain elements within the images that appeal to buyers or renters. These typically include the street appeal of the front façade, privacy levels, and presentation of the gardens. Depending on the home, other important features for some people may include ease of access, security fencing and availability of undercover car parking for vehicle/s. Exterior images are generally easier to capture than interior images as there are less technical elements to consider, and the dynamic range of the image is usually quite narrow. A total of three brackets (without using flash) is usually enough to capture the dynamic range of the image. When photographing patios, courtyards, and balconies, you want the viewer to experience the atmosphere of the space, whether that be cozy and private, bright and airy, free and fun, etc., while also incorporating any views or outlooks the property has to offer. To capture views from a balcony, raise the height of your camera slightly so that it is positioned above the height of the railing and the outdoor furniture (i.e., outdoor dining table). Images of views are essentially landscape photographs (or cityscape, seascape photos depending on the outlook). Depending on the view, you may need to zoom in slightly to crop out any lifesunwanted object or highlight a distant city skyline. Avoid using a focal length greater than 60mm as it is not a true representation of the view. Closeup shots should include tableware, coffee cups, flowers and any other décor or garden features in the exterior space. In next week’s article I will discuss photographing lifestyle facilities. Did you like this article? If you found this information valuable, feel free to support my blog by buying a coffee – https://www.buymeacoffee.com/repc

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to top
Close